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on Conversion Rate Optimization

A/B test case study: Call to action button increases conversions by 62%

We have published quite a few case studies in past regarding the positive influence of call to action buttons. The testing could be in the form of adding a call to action button when original design didn’t have one, testing a different one or even in the form of  different text for each call to action buttons.

Consolidated Label, one of our customers, A/B tested a new design with a prominent call to action button on their test page. Their original web design did not have any call to action buttons so they tried making an A/B test with one. They did expect an increase in conversions but they didn’t expect it to produce 62% increase in conversions over the original design. The testing helped them gauge the difference a single button can make. Consolidated Label manufactures custom printed labels for retail products in a variety of markets including Food, Beverage, Health & Beauty, and Health markets.

Here are the screenshots of both the Control (original design) and the variation (new design).

Control

Variation (with call to action button) 62% increase in conversions

On asking what lessons they learnt from testing, this is what Tracy Gamlin of Consolidated Label had to say:

Make your desired conversion goal obvious, but harmonious to the rest of the design.  Also, giving people a few places on a page to get to the conversion accommodates different types of users.  For example, the people who just want to get a quote get their button at the top of the page, whereas people who need more substantiation get the opportunity to quote further down the page after they’ve read more copy/seen more images.

Tracy further added, “We’ve found VWO to be immensely valuable for all of our testing needs.  Ultimately, it confirms our feelings with actual data – and many times it even surprises us!”.

If you still haven’t started A/B testing, now is a good time to give Visual Website Optimizer a try with unlimited simultaneous tests.

Founder and CEO of Wingify.

Comments (2)

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  1. Interesting, but not terribly surprising. I see this as more of a win for usability, as it really just proves that a bunch of people who saw the original design were probably already primed to request a quote, but couldn’t easily find a way to do it… or didn’t even know that was an option from the control page.

    From my own testing experience… testing any page that does not include an offer against a page that does almost always produces the same result (yes, you guessed it).

    And testing binary elements (e.g., things that are “on” or “off”) is not nearly as interesting as testing elements along a continuum (e.g., “on” versus “more on”).

    Cool that you’re sharing these, Paras.

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